The Three Kingdoms Volume 2

 

 

 

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The THREE KINGDOMS
VOLUME 2

The Sleeping Dragon

LUO GUANZHONG

Translated by YU SUMEI

Edited by RONALD C. IVERSON

TUTTLE
Publishing
Tokyo | Rutland, Vermont | Singapore

Published by Tuttle Publishing, an imprint of Periplus Editions (HK) Ltd.

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Copyright © 2014 Ronald C. Iverson

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Contents

CHAPTER THIRTY-SIX

Liu Bei Schemes to Capture Fancheng
Xu Shu Leaves and Recommends Zhuge Liang

CHAPTER THIRTY-SEVEN

Sima Hui Recommends Zhuge Liang
Liu Bei Pays Three Visits to Zhuge Liang’s Cottage

CHAPTER THIRTY-EIGHT

Zhuge Liang Outlines Plans for Three Kingdoms
Sun Quan Attacks Huang Zu to Avenge His Father

CHAPTER THIRTY-NINE

At Jingzhou Liu Qi Thrice Begs for Advice
At Bowang Zhuge Liang Directs His First Battle

CHAPTER FORTY

Lady Cai Plans to Submit Jingzhou to Cao Cao
Zhuge Liang Burns Xinye

CHAPTER FORTY-ONE

Liu Bei Leads His People Across the River
Zhao Yun Rescues the Child of His Lord

CHAPTER FORTY-TWO

Zhang Fei Raises Havoc at Long Slope Bridge
Liu Bei Retreats to Jiangxia in Defeat

CHAPTER FORTY-THREE

Zhuge Liang Debates with the Scholars of Wu
Lu Su Denounces the Majority Opinion

CHAPTER FORTY-FOUR

Zhuge Liang Stirs Zhou Yu to Action
Sun Quan Decides to Attack Cao Cao

CHAPTER FORTY-FIVE

Cao Cao Suffers Defeat at the Junction of Three Rivers
Jiang Gan Is Tricked at a Gathering of Heroes

CHAPTER FORTY-SIX

Zhuge Liang “Borrows” Arrows by Means of a Wonderful Scheme
Huang Gai Accepts Punishment to Implement a Secret Plan

CHAPTER FORTY-SEVEN

Kan Ze Delivers the Letter of False Defection
Pang Tong Suggests Linking the Ships by Chains

CHAPTER FORTY-EIGHT

Cao Cao Feasts on the Yangtze and Composes a Song
The Northern Men Attack the South Using Chained Ships

CHAPTER FORTY-NINE

On the Altar of Seven Stars Zhuge Liang Prays for an Easterly Wind
At the Junction of Three Rivers Zhou Yu Sets Fire to Cao Cao’s Fleet

CHAPTER FIFTY

Zhuge Liang Foresees the Huarong Episode
Guan Yu Lets Cao Cao Escape Out of Friendship

CHAPTER FIFTY-ONE

A Great Battle Is Fought Between North and South
Zhuge Liang Provokes Zhou Yu to Anger for the First Time

CHAPTER FIFTY-TWO

Zhuge Liang Defends Himself for Seizing Three Cities
Zhao Yun Uses a Clever Scheme to Capture Guiyang

CHAPTER FIFTY-THREE

Guan Yu Releases Huang Zhong from a Sense of Righteousness
Sun Quan Fights a Great Battle with Zhang Liao

CHAPTER FIFTY-FOUR

Dowager Wu Meets Her Son-in-Law at a Temple
Liu Bei Takes a Worthy Consort

CHAPTER FIFTY-FIVE

Liu Bei Cleverly Persuades His Bride to Leave Wu
Zhuge Liang Provokes Zhou Yu to Anger a Second Time

CHAPTER FIFTY-SIX

Cao Cao Gives a Banquet in the Bronze Bird Tower
Zhuge Liang Provokes Zhou Yu to Anger a Third Time

CHAPTER FIFTY-SEVEN

Zhuge Liang Mourns at Caisang
Pang Tong Governs at Leiyang

CHAPTER FIFTY-EIGHT

Ma Chao Raises an Army for Vengeance
Cao Cao Shaves His Beard and Loses His Robe When Escaping

CHAPTER FIFTY-NINE

Xu Chu Strips for a Fight with Ma Chao
Cao Cao Sows Dissension Between Ma Chao and Han Sui

CHAPTER SIXTY

Zhang Song Turns the Tables on Yang Xiu
Pang Tong Advises Liu Bei to Seize the West

CHAPTER SIXTY-ONE

Zhao Yun Rescues A-Dou on the River
Sun Quan Writes a Letter to Repulse Cao Cao

CHAPTER SIXTY-TWO

Yang and Gao are Slain at the Fall of Fu Pass
Huang Zhong and Wei Yan Rival with Each Other to take Luocheng

CHAPTER SIXTY-THREE

Zhuge Liang Mourns the Death of Pang Tong
Zhang Fei Releases Yan Yan

CHAPTER SIXTY-FOUR

Zhuge Liang Plans to Capture Zhang Ren
Yang Fu Borrows an Army to Destroy Ma Chao

CHAPTER SIXTY-FIVE

Ma Chao Fights a Great Battle at Jiameng Pass
Liu Bei Assumes Governorship of Yizhou

CHAPTER SIXTY-SIX

Armed with His Sword, Guan Yu Goes to a Feast Alone
Empress Fu Devotes Her Life to the State

CHAPTER SIXTY-SEVEN

Cao Cao Conquers Hanzhong
Zhang Liao Spreads Terror at Xiaoyao Ford

CHAPTER SIXTY-EIGHT

Gan Ning Leads a Hundred Horsemen to Raid Cao Cao’s Camp
Zuo Ci Flings a Cup to Taunt Cao Cao

CHAPTER SIXTY-NINE

Guan Lu Divines by the Book of Changes
Five Loyal Souls Die for Their Country

CHAPTER SEVENTY

Fierce Zhang Fei Takes Wakou Pass by a Clever Scheme
Aged Huang Zhong Captures Mount Tiandang by a Stratagem

CHAPTER SEVENTY-ONE

Huang Zhong Scores a Victory with the Capture of Dui Hill
Zhao Yun Conquers a Host on the Han Waters

CHAPTER SEVENTY-TWO

Zhuge Liang Conquers Hanzhong by Strategy
Cao Cao Withdraws His Army into Sloping Valley

CHAPTER SEVENTY-THREE

Liu Bei Becomes Prince of Hanzhong
Guan Yu Attacks and Occupies Xiangyang

CHAPTER SEVENTY-FOUR

Pang De Takes His Coffin on a Campaign
Guan Yu Drowns Seven Enemy Forces

List of Main Characters

Cai Mao
—brother-in-law of Liu Biao

Cao Cao (Cao Meng-de,
A.D.
155–220)
—prime minister to Emperor Xian, controls the real power of the state; later created Duke of Wei, Prince of Wei and posthumously, Emperor Wu of Wei Dynasty

Cao Hong
—cousin of Cao Cao and senior officer under him

Cao Pi (
A.D.
187–226)
—second son
of Cao Cao, later first emperor (Emperor Wen) of Wei Dynasty, which he established in
A.D.
220

Cao Ren
—cousin of Cao Cao and senior officer under him

Cao Rui
—son of Cao Pi, later Emperor Ming of Wei

Cao Shuang
—son of Cao Zhen, enemy of Sima Yi

Cao Zhen
—senior officer of Wei

Cao Zhi (Cao Zi-jian,
A.D.
192–232)
— favorite son of Cao Cao and a famed poet

Chen Deng
—advisor to Lu Bu but later plots his destruction

Chen Gong
—chief advisor to Lu Bu

Chen Lin
—notable scholar, first served as advisor to Yuan Shao but later surrendered to Cao Cao

Chen Wu
—senior officer of Wu

Cheng Pu
—senior officer of Wu

Cheng Yu
—advisor to Cao Cao

Deng Ai
—commander of the forces of Wei after Sima Yi

Dian Wei
—bodyguard to Cao Cao

Diao Chan (Sable Cicada)
—singing girl at Wang Yun’s house, who helps her master destroy Dong Zhuo; concubine of Lu Bu

Ding Feng
—senior officer of Wu

Dong Cheng
—general of Han and relative to the imperial house, who receives the secret edict from Emperor Xian to assassinate Cao Cao

Dong Zhuo
—governor of Hedong, later establishes himself as prime minister of Han; set up Emperor Xian in place of his brother, Emperor Shao, in order to build his own power

Emperor Shao (Liu Bian)
—son of Emperor Ling and Empress He, deposed and murdered by Dong Zhuo

Emperor Xian (Liu Xie)
—brother
of Emperor Shao, a puppet ruler controlled by his ministers; deposed by Cao Pi in
A.D.
220 (r.
A.D.
189–220)

Empress Dowager He
—mother of Emperor Shao, sister of He Jin; murdered by Dong Zhuo

Fa Zheng
—Liu Zhang’s official who helped Liu Bei acquire the rule of Shu

Feng Ji
—advisor to Yuan Shao, enemy of Tian Feng

Gan Ning (Gan Xin-ba)
—senior officer of Wu, famed for his bravery

Gao Shun
—officer under Lu Bu

Gongsun Zan
—patron of Liu Bei and one of the seventeen lords who join forces to wage war on Dong Zhuo; commits suicide after being destroyed by Yuan Shao

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