Wolf's Bliss (Paranormal BBW Erotic Romance, Alpha Wolf Mate)

 

Wolf’s
Bliss

 

By
Haley Nix

 
Copyright Information

 

Copyright
© 2014 By Haley Nix

Wolf’s
Bliss
is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places,
incidents and events are the products of the author’s imagination or used
fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual events or locales or persons, living or
dead, is entirely coincidental.

All
rights reserved. This book or portions thereof may not be reproduced, scanned,
or distributed in any form whatsoever without direct permission from the
author.

This
book is intended
Only for Mature Audiences 18+.
It contains mature
themes, substantial sexually explicit scenes and graphic language which may be
considered offensive by some readers.

Wolf’s Bliss

 

When I started my shift at 11 PM, the ER
was bustling with activity, pretty typical for a Saturday night. We had lots of
people come in with injuries incurred while walking around drunk, getting in
fights at bars, general recklessness, etc. Not infrequently we had something
more tragic. The first hours of the shift were busy, but not unusual. It was
only around 2 AM that something a little stranger happened.

A man was being admitted to the
hospital: white, age in the late twenties or early thirties, height somewhere
over six feet, athletic build. We couldn’t confirm any of the details because
he was unconscious. His face was cut badly, and the doctors were checking for
head trauma and internal bleeding. He looked to be in pretty bad shape and a
decision was made to place him in the ICU. That’s when I was assigned to look
after him.

I like my job as a nurse. Sure the hours are long
and I’m put in some tough situations, but I can handle it. Besides, the money
is good and I like helping people. It always feels good to see one of my
patients walking out of the hospital on their own two feet, happy in their
newly restored health.

But some of the things I see in the ER could shake
any woman’s confidence: people with gunshot wounds, the survivors of car
accidents, and other gruesome things. The man I was currently tending to was
one of those for whom I felt a great deal of sympathy. His injuries looked to
be extreme, and the saddest part was that he was so damn young. I checked his
vitals and set up his IV. When everything looked to be under control, I went to
go check on my other patients.

When I came back a few hours later, he was still
lying there unconscious. The monitors showed that he was stable, all his vitals
seemed to be in order. Still, no signs of life behind those closed eyes. I
would have lingered for a while, watching over him as he lay there, maybe even
saying a short, silent prayer, but I had many other patients to attend to so I
had to get on with my shift.

Like most other busy nights at the hospital, my
shift went by quickly and before I knew it daylight was breaking. At 9 AM, I
clocked out, heading home to sleep through the day and work the night shift all
over again the following day. Ten long hours at work, but it felt good. I knew
I’d sleep well when I made it back to my apartment.

 

***

 

When I came in the following night, I went to check
in on my mysterious patient. He was still unconscious, but his breathing was
even and deep and all his vitals showed no sign of imminent threat. Upon first
glance I noticed something very peculiar: his face was flawless, his skin
smooth beneath a bit of  dark scruff.

In and of itself, I’m sure that doesn’t seem strange,
but I remembered that when he was first admitted he’d had a huge gash across
his face, a deep wound that would have taken weeks to fully heal. Even then, I
would have expected it to leave a very noticeable scar.

I leaned in to take a closer look at him, trying to
see if I could discern where the cut had been. I saw the faintest bit of scar,
incredibly light so as to be nearly imperceptible exactly where the wound had been
the night before.

My heart started racing when I saw that; I’m not
exactly sure why. Something was not right, and all of the sudden I felt scared,
as if I was in the presence of something beyond my comprehension. I checked his
vitals again and quickly left the room. I just had to get out of there and
catch my breath, wait for my heart rate to gradually fall back to normal. I left
to attend to my other patients in the East wing.

 

***

 

As I checked on my other patients, I found my mind
continuously wandering back to the mysterious man in the ICU.
Who was he?
What was he?

You see, when he came into the hospital, his pockets
had been emptied. No driver’s license, no credit cards, no source of
identification whatsoever. Since he was unconscious, no one even knew his name,
his story, how he’d found himself in such poor condition abandoned in the park.
Because he’d taken a blow to the head, there was a good chance even he may not
remember what had brought him into the hospital.

My nightly routine was interrupted when we had
another patient enter in critical condition. She’d been hit by a drunk driver
and needed immediate surgery. Another nurse and I helped prep the room for the
doctors involved. When we were done, we went to do a second round of checks on
our respective patients.

One of the easier things about the night shift was
that patients were typically asleep. This made things rather routine. I’d
simply go in and make sure things were under control, then head off to the next
room to do the same. Sometimes patients were awake and had specific requests,
but usually they weren’t too hard to deal with.

I did my second round of checks in reverse order. I
don’t know what my problem was, but for some reason I didn’t want to face the
strange man with the mysteriously healing cut. I decided to put if off a little
longer by saving him for last.

Ultimately, this proved to be a stupid decision.
Instead of just going in and getting it over with, I was postponing it,
allowing my anxiety to build up. I was dreading the moment more and more with
each subsequent patient I saw. But finally there was no putting it off anymore.
I headed to Room 340 to check on him.

I walked back into the room and was very
relieved to find that nothing much seemed to have changed. Machines still
hummed, beeping and blinking away. The patient was stable and all was well.
Soon it would be time to clock out for the day. Thank goodness. I could use the
rest.

 

***

 

The next night I showed up at the
hospital to be greeted with some surprising news. The patient had woken up. He
was completely lucid and coherent, but not very talkative. He seemed unable to
remember his name or anything related to his personal identity. When asked
about the events that had landed him unconscious in a hospital bed, he had no
answers.

I was told all of this second hand by a
nurse who worked the shift before me. She said the man didn’t seem unfriendly,
but that he seemed to be hiding something. She had a feeling that he wasn’t
being completely forthright with the doctors.

When I asked her what made her think
this, she told me she didn’t know, that she could just sort of
sense
it.
I knew I’d get a chance later in the night to form my own opinion, but frankly
I was in no rush to enter the room. Things had been strange enough when he’d
been unconscious, who knew what it might be like to speak with him.

I made my rounds, checking on my other
patients, but was soon alerted to Room 340. The heart rate monitor was setting
off a red light in the nurse’s station. I went in to check on the man and found
him sitting up in bed, his chest bare as he pulled off the nodes of his Holter
monitor.

“What are you doing?” I asked in a stern
tone. “You have to keep that on.”

“I’m leaving,” he said, pulling each node
off one by one.

“No you’re not,” I said, pushing him
back down on the bed. “The doctors need to keep a close eye on you.”

I saw a dangerous look enter his eyes
after I’d pushed him down. He lay back in the bed, but I had the feeling he
might spring up again at any second, knocking me to the floor and running out
of the hospital. There was something wild in his eyes. He didn’t look like a
man who’d been nearly killed; he seemed to be teeming with life, health, and
vitality. He certainly no longer looked like a man who should be in a hospital.

I placed my hand on his chest as I
re-attached the nodes of his heart rate monitor. I felt a little shock when I
touched him, a sort of electric tingling that made my own body come alive,
feeling more vibrant. I looked into his face, studying it for a second, as if
unsure what to make of him.

“What’s your name?” he asked.

“Nurse Page,” I said, politely, still fiddling
with his heart rate monitor.

“I mean your first name,” he said.

I gave him a glare.

“Alison,” I said. “People call me Ali
around here.”

“Mine’s Caleb.”

I tensed up, stopping what I was doing
to look at him.

“I thought you couldn’t remember your
name. I thought you couldn’t remember
anything
.”

“It just came back to me,” he said casually.

I hesitated, but thought better about challenging
him on this.

“Have you remembered anything else?”

“No, not really.”

“So you still don’t know what happened
to you?”

“No,” he said.

He seemed to be speaking earnestly, but
I had no way of really knowing. But there was still something I needed an
explanation for.

“Why were you trying to leave?” I asked,
attempting to be nonchalant.

“I don’t know. I just wanted to,” he
said.

Nothing about this seemed right.
Suddenly, I felt my heart beating faster again, my pulse pounding and my blood
getting hot.

“I don’t believe you,” I blurted out.
“You’re lying about something.”

“No, really. I don’t know why I was
trying to leave. I just don’t like hospitals.”

“No, you’re lying. There’s something
you’re not telling me.”

“Close the door,” he said.

“No,” I said sternly.

“Close it.”

He didn’t raise his voice, but his tone
let me know that I had to obey him –
or else
. I walked over and shut the
door, leaning my body up against it, wanting to stay as far away from him as
possible in case he made a move at me.

“I’m not safe here,” said Caleb.

He kept his eyes steadily on me as he
said this, as if trying to imbue in me some sense of urgency. He was trying to
get me to let him leave, to
help
him even.

“This is a hospital,” I said. “It’s the
best place for someone in your condition.”

“Someone in my
condition
? I’m
fine.”

“You’re not fine. You have retrograde
amnesia. You didn’t know your own name until ten minutes ago.”

“I don’t have amnesia,” he said flatly.
“I need to get out of here.”

“No, wait a second. Why did you lie to
the doctors? They’re trying to help you.”

“I said
I’m fine
. Besides, no one is going to
believe me anyway.”

“Try me,” I said, easing up a bit and
moving closer to him.

“How do I know I can trust you?” asked
Caleb.

“Because I just want to understand what’s
wrong so I can help you.”

“If you wanted to help me, you’d show me
how to get out of here.”

“I need to know why you’re trying to
leave.”

“There are men after me. If they find
out I’m here, I become an easy target. I need to be on the move.
Constantly
on the move
.”

“Who are these men?
Who are you?

“Come here,” he said.

I don’t know why, but for some reason I
listened to him. I did as he said. I walked slowly over to the side of the bed,
still hesitant, hovering just outside of his reach.

“Why are they after you?” I asked, my
voice trembling just a bit.

I tried my best to conceal my
nervousness.

“Come closer, and I’ll tell you,” said
Caleb, his eyes still trained on me.

I took a step closer and immediately he
pulled me into him. He grabbed my breasts, shoving his face between them and
inhaling deeply. My heart beat wildly and I closed my eyes.

“It’s you,” he said softly, inhaling
once again.

“It’s
me
? It’s me
what
?” I
said, pushing him off of me, finally coming to my senses.

“You’re my mate,” he said. “Finally, I
know I can trust you. Now help me get out of here.”

“Your
mate
?
What the hell are
you talking about
? You’re freaking me out.”

I reached over attempting to press the
button that would signal an emergency, the button that would send someone else
running to my aid. But Caleb grabbed my hand, easily holding me back. His
strength was impossible for me to surmount.

“No one is going to save you. You’re
mine now, and you’re going to do what I say. Nod if you understand.”

I nodded, still silent, scared to death
by the force he was showing – and the emotions that I found flowing through me,
ephemeral taboo thoughts that surfaced in my mind and disappeared seconds
later.

“Good, and now you’ll help me get out of
here.”

“I can’t do that. I’ll lose my job.”

“You
can
and you
will
.
Come on, we’re going for a walk.”

Caleb got up out of the bed. He’d torn
off his hospital gown earlier and now stood naked before me. I couldn’t help
but glance down below his abs, seeing his monstrous cock dangling. I blushed
and looked away.

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